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Real life stories from Visian ICL patients

“I feel like a big part of health is using what your body already has. Visian ICL is in line with that because it’s keeping your eye completely intact. My eye is still my eye.”

Eve Torres Gracie

Jiu Jitsu Instructor

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Phil Torres

Entomologist, TV Show Host

I had my first opportunity to put my Visian ICL eyes to the test recently in the Amazon rainforest, and it couldn't have been more exciting to be able to spot rare species better than ever.
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Jennifer Hero

“The thing that I love about the Visian ICL is that they are putting a lens in there that can be removed.”

Jennifer Puno

Web Designer

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Ready to Discover Visual Freedom With EVO? Find a Doctor Today

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Andrew Oxenham

Photographer

There’s a few big road blocks to having glasses and being a photographer. Now I’ve got Visian ICL and I can run out and live my life unhindered.
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“I would never be able to just wake up and go, and now I can literally just roll out of bed and go straight to the farmer's market.”

Sara Tso

Chef

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Visian ICL feels like I am finally experiencing life the way it is meant to be experienced; there are no more barriers between me and the world.

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Gayane Khechoomian

Attorney

I don’t say this a lot, but it really did change my life. Vision is important to me… and I’m not someone that likes to be encumbered by anything.

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Jennifer Van Dijk

Pilot

Sports are difficult with glasses. Contacts are better, but I still have to worry about them falling out at the worst possible time. Since getting Visian ICL, I don’t even think about those things anymore.

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James Robinson

Computer Programmer

In the past, I would make short term decisions that would be cheaper and would fix the problem short term. This (Visian ICL) fixed the problem long term.

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Ashley Acda

Teacher

Important Safety Information

The EVO/EVO+ ICLs are designed for the correction/reduction of myopia in adults ranging from -0.5 D to -20.0 D with less than or equal to 6.0 D of astigmatism at the spectacle plane. The Canada EVO models have a spherical power range of -3.0 D to -18.0 D and cylinder power range of 1.0 D to 6.0 D. The Canada EVO+ models have a spherical power range of -3.0 D to -14.0 D and cylinder power range of 1.0 D to 6.0 D. The hyperopic ICL’s are available in powers ranging from +3.0 to +10.0 diopters for the correction/reduction of hyperopia. The ICLs are indicated for patients who are 21 to 60 years of age. In order to be sure that your surgeon will use a ICL with the most adequate power for your eye, your nearsightedness, farsightedness and astigmatism should be stable for at least a year before undergoing eye surgery. ICL surgery may improve your vision without eyeglasses or contact lenses. ICL surgery does not eliminate the need for reading glasses, even if you have never worn them before. ICL represents an alternative to other refractive surgeries including, laser assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK), photorefractive keratectomy (PRK), incisional surgeries, or other means to correct your vision such as contact lenses and eye glasses. Implantation of an ICL is a surgical procedure, and as such, carries potentially serious risks. The following represent potential complications/adverse reactions reported in conjunction with refractive surgery in general: additional surgeries, cataract formation, loss of best corrected vision, raised pressure inside the eye, loss of cells on the innermost surface of the cornea, conjunctival irritation, acute corneal swelling, persistent corneal swelling, endophthalmitis (total eye infection), significant glare and/or halos around lights, hyphaema (blood in the eye), hypopyon (pus in the eye), eye infection, ICL dislocation, macular oedema, non-reactive pupil, pupillary block glaucoma, severe inflammation of the eye, iritis, uveitis, vitreous loss and corneal transplant. Before considering ICL surgery you should have a complete eye examination and talk with your eye care professional about ICL surgery, especially the potential benefits, risks, and complications. You should discuss the time needed for healing after surgery.

References

References

1. Patient Survey, STAAR Surgical ICL Data Registry, 2018

2. Sanders D. Vukich JA. Comparison of implantable collamer lens (ICL) and laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) for Low Myopia. Cornea. 2006 Dec; 25(10):1139-46. Patient Survey, STAAR Surgical ICL Data Registry, 2018

3. Naves, J.S. Carracedo, G. Cacho-Babillo, I. Diadenosine Nucleotid Measurements as Dry-Eye Score in Patients After LASIK and ICL Surgery. Presented at American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery (ASCRS) 2012.

4. Shoja, MR. Besharati, MR. Dry eye after LASIK for myopia: Incidence and risk factors. European Journal of Ophthalmology. 2007; 17(1): pp. 1-6.

5a. Lee, Jae Bum et al. Comparison of tear secretion and tear film instability after photorefractive keratectomy and laser in situ keratomileusis. Journal of Cataract & Refractive Surgery , Volume 26 , Issue 9 , 1326 - 1331.

5b. Parkhurst, G. Psolka, M. Kezirian, G. Phakic intraocular lens implantantion in United States military warfighters: A retrospective analysis of early clinical outcomes of the Visian ICL. J Refract Surg. 2011;27(7):473-481.

*American Refractive Surgery Council